Commit d855a682 authored by Teddy Warner's avatar Teddy Warner
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ep final

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# 6. Architecture Types
# 6. Embedded Programming Architecture Types
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This week's assignment was to learn about and analyze different workflows for diferent types of architectures. As we had only programmed microcontrollers with variants of C thus far in Fab Academy, we decided to configure and program an LED to blink on a Raspberry Pi 4 and a Raspberry Pi Pico in order to investigate the programming and uploading process using different form factor boards and a different language from what we are used to.
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This week's assignment was to learn about and analyze different workflows for different types of architectures.
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## Raspberry Pi
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![](../images/week06/raspberry_pi_photo_of_code.jpg)
![](../images/week06/raspberry_pi_troubleshooting.jpg)
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We decided to write the python using an internal text-editor, nano, that is included in the base installation of most Linux distros, including base installations of Ubunto and Debian, that can be opened with the command 'sudo nano *filename*' and executed by simply typing the filename into an active Linux shell. This method does not require an external IDE that must be installed by a user, and due to the simplicity of the code that was necessary for our LED to blink, it made total sense to utilize this basic text editor rather than using alternative environments like Thonny or IDLE.
After repeated troubleshooting with very simple codes, we finally found 2 possible reasons the LED was not blinking. The first thing we found was that instead of using a 330 ᘯ resistor, we were accidentally using a 1,000,000 ᘯ resistor. While the LED would technically still turn on, it would be so dim that the change would not be visible to humans, which defeated the purpose of making the LED blink. We ultimately discovered that the 1,000,000 ᘯ resistors were mixed with the 330 ᘯ resistors in our lab, and an incorrect resistor had been selected from the box. After swapping the 1,000,000 ᘯ for a 330 ᘯ resistor that we verified did have the correct resistance value with a multimeter, the LED still did not blink.
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## Conclusion
After successfully uploading a code that effectively accomplished an identical task using two vastly disparate workflows for two different boards, our group reflected on the stark differences that exist between the Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspberry Pi Pico. Firstly, we felt that our task was not intensive enough for the performance differences between the two devices to be noticeable in their ability to complete the task, meaning that the Pico made far more financial sense as it costs roughly 10% that of its mircocomputer counterpart. We found that the rPi 4 made rapid re-iteration significantly easier, as the Pico requires a multi-step process in order to be ready to receive fresh code injections via PuTTy. Ultimately, our group work for embedded programming week in comparing similar tasks on two different architectures provided an intriguing glimpse into the processes outside of the Arduino IDE and Atmel ecosystem, which many of us hope to utilize in our final projects as well as in future endeavors outside of Fab Academy.
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After a good bit of troubleshooting with very simple codes, we finally found 2 sources of error. The first thing we found was that instead of using a 330 ᘯ resistor, we were accidentally using a 1,000,000 ᘯ resistor. While there would still be some amount of current passing through the LED, it would be so slight that there would be no visible change. The reason we were using the incorrect resistor was that the 1,000,000 ᘯ resistor were in the 330 ᘯ resistor box and we did not check the value with a multimeter. This, however, did not solve our issue.
Our second possible issue was the LED itself. To test out this theory, we made a very simple circuit consisting only of a power source, ground, the LED, and a 330 ᘯ resistor. If the LED was working correctly, it should turn on immediately after completing this circuit. Since it did not, however, turn on, we identified that the problem was the LED. When we tried the same circuit with a different LED, it turned on. When we used this new LED in the blink circuit that was connecte to the Raspberry Pi, it worked flawlessly.
[INSERT WORKING RASPBERRY PI VIDEO]
## Raspberry PI Pico
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gcQldlUCLuM" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Kc4uWvPPsAE" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
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