Commit 1a268691 authored by Drew Griggs's avatar Drew Griggs
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pinball

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# 7. Machine building - Pinball Machine
This group includes [Jack Hollingsworth](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/jack-hollingsworth/), [Miller Workman](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/miller-workman/), [Drew Griggs](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/drew-griggs/), and [James Rutter](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/james-rutter/)
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This group includes [Jack Hollingsworth](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/jack-hollingsworth/), [Miller Workman](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/miller-workman/), [Drew Griggs](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/drew-griggs/), and [James Rutter](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/charlotte/students/james-rutter/)
## Defining project idea
Our group decided to design and create a custom pinball machine. We were inspired by a pinball machine owned by our teammate Jack Hollingsworth. We also found a [similar project](https://www.instructables.com/How-to-Build-an-Arduino-Pinball-Machine/) to our own, which also helped us while working out our electronics and design needs.
IMAGE OF PINBALL MACHINE
IMAGE OF SIMILAR PROJECT
### BOM
We first started by knocking out what parts we would use. We created this BOM to narrow down our requirements. Some of the electronics were the same as the tones in the similar pinball machine project since they seemed like they would work.
<iframe src="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRlWGcYf3U_rmOkba7HXPlYrOK8o21qXEJdrtq7jk-b7wUH2Q_JQ4VJXtXeqfPHYv6NJkuMBuZ5UViY/pubhtml?widget=true&amp;headers=false"></iframe>
### Early CAD
We started by designing the basics of how the pinball machine would look. We designed the size of the pinball machine, included joints and legs, and some other pieces like buttons. The buttons were just for aesthetic- the buttons we chose can just be screwed in- but they were the correct size.
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf3f0e48a91941031e?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
While designing the shape of the final product, we started designing some of the mechanics that would be used in our machine. We decided to include a bumper element which would push the ball down and away, as well as the flipper mechanics.
### 3D design- bumper
We started by designing the bumper element. We first designed a main body, then a shell that would actually push down and “bump” the ball. The first design had 2 rods that would attach to the shell and to a solenoid that would be located under the playing field, and the second one had 3D printed parts that would go through the base.
CAD IMAGE
3D PRINT IMAGE
First Design:
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf4bf10fa6ea66d334?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
Second Design:
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf0814d833a3d9f65d?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
### 3D DESIGN- paddles
Next, we designed the paddle mechanics. We designed it so that when the solenoid fired, it would push a 3D printed part, causing it to rotate. A metal rod attached to the 3D printed part would then go up to the top of the playing field, where the paddle would be attached. The paddle would then rotate. When the solenoid is relaxed, a spring attached to the part will compress, causing the pieces to rotate to their starting places.
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf592473b11a5105ea?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
CAD IMAGE
3D PRINT IMAGE
### 3D DESIGN- ball launcher mount
We ordered a ball launcher for our project, but we still needed to mount it to our frame. Since we cut out a square for it to fit in, it was very simple to 3D print a frame around the launcher with a hole for the launcher to fit in.
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf286ff4d5774f8d19?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
3D PRINT IMAGE
### 3D DESIGN- Spinner element
The final element we decided to include was an acryllic piece that would reside somewhere towards the center of the playing field. This piece would constantly spin in a circle, adding to the complexity of play. We designed this piece in Fusion and laser cut it out. It turned out well, and we were able to connect it to a servo motor and our board:
IMAGE OF LASER CUT
IMAGE OF ASSEMBLY
### ASPIRE- creating tool paths for sides
After finishing the early cad work, we then milled them out. We started by turning them into 2D sketches, putting them into Corel to clean them up and turn them into SVGs, and finally turning the SVGs into tool paths in Aspire. We created tool paths for each side of the frame of the pinball machine. It included a slot cut for the paying field to slot into, joints, and holes for buttons.
ASPIRE IMAGES
### MACHINING THE PARTS
Next, we cut out these parts on our labs Shopbot. We cut out the frame in wood because it is strong yet fairly cheap. We followed our labs workflow to operate the machine, and cut out each of the pieces.
IMAGE OF SHOPBOT AND CUTS
### 2D DESIGN Playfield CAD
Next, we designed the actual playfield. While machining, we accidentally cut out the front piece mirrored horizontally, so the hole for the launcher was actually on the left instead of the right. To resolve this issue, we simply mirrored our playfield after designing it so it would still work.
We then milled the playfield out with our Shopbot after converting the 2D sketch into a tool path through Corel Draw and Aspire. It milled out very nicely:
2D playfield with mirrored copy:
IMAGE
IMAGE OF MILLED PLAYFIELD
### 3D DESIGN- routers
Our playfield included quite a few holes that would hold routes for the ball. We designed features that would stick through the playfield in these holes that would route the ball above the playfield.
<iframe src="https://charlottelatin32.autodesk360.com/shares/public/SH919a0QTf3c32634dcf4fb34ec715c91d37?mode=embed" width="640" height="480" allowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0"></iframe>
IMAGE OF CAD OF BALL ROUTERS
### ELECTRONICS WORK- relays, solenoids, and Arduino
While milling the parts, our group continued working on electronics. We decided on using a relay board to control the bumper solenoids, since they would need to be triggered at certain times, and to hard wire the buttons to the paddle solenoids. We also decided on using touch sensors to detect where the ball is in order to update the score. We were able to control the solenoids in this way:
VIDEOS OF SOLENOIDS
ARDUINO CODE
### RASPBERRY PI- interface
To display and update score, we decided to use a Raspberry PI interface. It would connect to our Arduino via Serial, and would include data from our sensors.
IMAGE OF CODE
IMAGE OF INTERFACE
Remaining work:
3D DESIGN- motor mounts
ASSEMBLY- Playing field
ASSEMBLY- Electronics
Final product
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