Commit f20d4a64 authored by Nidhie Dhiman's avatar Nidhie Dhiman
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Merge branch 'master' into 'master'

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......@@ -79,19 +79,25 @@ The cuts on the low side of the panel's front are thicker because the kerf will
## DPI and Frequency
DPI is a term used when rastering with a laser cutter, while "frequency" is related to the vector functioning of a laser cutter. Frequency can be set on the laser cutter we tested from 1 to 100. As we all discussed these two parameters, we realized that DPI and frequency were similar in their functionality. We decided to use two shapes- a circle and a square- both with the same center diameter, and we decided to test the frequency and DPI on the Epilog Fusion M2 Laser in the CLS Fab Lab (since this laser cutter requires thes setting to be entered manually with each job).
The steps we used to determine the best DPI were:
1. Create a file in Corel Draw with a small square and a small rectangle.
2. Set the fill inside the circle and square to black (through Object Properties).
3. Make sure that the outside pen stroke is set to 0.5.
4. Run the laser cutter using the lowest DPI under the raster settings, and increase it one level for each test. (75 --> 100 --> 200 --> 300 -- 600 --> 1200)
5. Examine the quality of the rastered shape (circle and square) on corrugated cardbard (that is 0.15" thick).
The steps we used to determine the best DPI were as follows in the table.
|Step|Description|
|:--:|-----------|
|1| Create a file in Corel Draw with a small square and a small rectangle.|
|2| Set the fill inside the circle and square to black (through Object Properties).|
|3| Make sure that the outside pen stroke is set to 0.5.|
|4| Run the laser cutter using the lowest DPI under the raster settings, and increase it one level for each test. (75 --> 100 --> 200 --> 300 -- 600 --> 1200)|
|5| Examine the quality of the rastered shape (circle and square) on corrugated cardbard (that is 0.15" thick).
The steps we used to determine the best frequency were:
1. Create a file in Corel Draw with a small square and a small rectangle.
2. Set the fill inside the circle and square to "no fill" (through Object Properties).
3. Make sure that the outside pen stroke is set to hairline (or 0.001").
4. Run the laser cutter using the lowest frequency under the vector settings, and increase it 10% (up to 60%) for each test. (10% --> 20% --> 30% --> 40% --> 50% --> 60%)
5. Examine the quality of the vectored shape (circle and square)-- how well it cut through corrugated cardbard (that is 0.15" thick).
|Step|Description|
|:--:|-----------|
|1| Create a file in Corel Draw with a small square and a small rectangle.|
|2| Set the fill inside the circle and square to "no fill" (through Object Properties).|
|3| Make sure that the outside pen stroke is set to hairline (or 0.001").|
|4| Run the laser cutter using the lowest frequency under the vector settings, and increase it 10% (up to 60%) for each test. (10% --> 20% --> 30% --> 40% --> 50% --> 60%)|
|5| Examine the quality of the vectored shape (circle and square)-- how well it cut through corrugated cardbard (that is 0.15" thick).
The following image shows the results of our tests.
......@@ -119,7 +125,7 @@ We ran this test several times on 1/8" plywood. First, we ran a baseline with th
| __DPI__ | 300 | 300 | 300 |
| __Frequency__ | 10 | 10 | 10 |
![week4-Laser-test-speed.jpg](../images/week4-Laser-test-speed.jpg#center)
![week4-Laser-test-speed](../images/week4-Laser-test-speed#center)
For rastering, the results of this test were pretty clear and as expected. Halving the power and doubling the speed led to very similar results. This can especially be seen on the engrave-wheel as compared to Test 1, which used the machines' standard reccomended settings. As expected, the "100%" section of the wheel, appears half as dark for the tests 2 and 3 as compared to test 1.
......
......@@ -107,7 +107,4 @@ If milling multiple PCB’s, use the “Open” button for each individual (pote
If the machine begins to falter, or to run poorly or inconsistently, stop the machine by pushing the large red emergency stop button on the lower right side. You can run the job again, but adjust the settings under the “Advanced” button/carrot based on the reason for the failure/inconsisten cut.
|Files Used|
|----------|
|[Line Test White-Removed SVG](https://www.dropbox.com/s/f9eiavkag7churu/linetest%20white%20removed.svg?dl=0)|
|[Line Test White-Removed CDR](https://www.dropbox.com/s/oqfzzv9qgayn6an/linetest%20white%20removed.cdr?dl=0)|
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[Link to Files](../files/adults_Electronics_Production/Electronics_Production.zip)
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......@@ -123,9 +123,4 @@ Workflow for Prusa Printers in CLS Fab Lab:
We printed a cube with three levels of infill (0%, 15% and 100%). We paused the prints mid-way through in order to see the infill (without the "lid"). We chose rectilinear infill (no other types were recommended at 100%). The image above shows all three cubes. The 0% infill setting would be used when a shell is needed. Fifteen percent is a good starting point for normal solid features; 100% is normally unnecessary and wasteful. However, this could be useful when compression strength is needed.
|File Links |
|---------------|
|[Charlotte Latin Prusa 3D Printers](https://www.dropbox.com/s/foo9kdbw47s2be5/Charlotte%20Latin%20Prusa%203D%20Printers.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Fab11C v11](https://www.dropbox.com/s/ua38mm5ditxvlqm/BlackberrySTL.stl?dl=0)|
|[3D Printer Test STL](https://www.dropbox.com/s/99zpkdvzbreg3yf/3D_printer_test_mini%20%281%29.STL?dl=0)|
|[3D Printer Test GCode](https://www.dropbox.com/s/jp84gad7utldx4b/3D_printer_test_mini_0.15mm_PLA_MINI_3h20m%20%281%29.gcode?dl=0)|
\ No newline at end of file
[Link to Files](../files/adults_3DScanning_Printing/3D_Scanning_Printing.zip)
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......@@ -2,7 +2,10 @@
## Oscilloscope
[These](http://mounttaylor.com/ref/electrical/measuring-voltages-with-scope.html) were the steps that we followed these steps to calibrate and get accustomed to the oscilloscope.
[These] were the steps that we followed these steps to calibrate and get accustomed to the oscilloscope:
<iframe width="950" height="600" src="hhttp://mounttaylor.com/ref/electrical/measuring-voltages-with-scope.html"></iframe>
<figcaption>Our Labs PCB Milling Workflow for the Bantam PCB Mill</figcaption>
### DC
Using a [SAMD11C](http://sheekgeek.org/2022/adamsheekgeek/samd11c-multi-use-board) board that each of us made, we connected the oscilloscope probe to the VCC of the board and the aligator clip to the same ground in the circuit:
......@@ -27,11 +30,14 @@ We decided to use our ATTiny Blinky board to experiment with the multimeter. Usi
|Image/Vide|Explanation|
|----------|-----------|
|![Capaciotr](../images/week07/Capacitor.jpg)|This test showed that the voltage across the capaitor was stabilized around 3.3V. This made sense because the switch on the [SAMD11](http://sheekgeek.org/2022/adamsheekgeek/samd11c-multi-use-board) was set for 3.3V (and not 5 V).|
|![Capacitor](../images/week07/Capacitor.jpg)|This test showed that the voltage across the capaitor was stabilized around 3.3V. This made sense because the switch on the [SAMD11](http://sheekgeek.org/2022/adamsheekgeek/samd11c-multi-use-board) was set for 3.3V (and not 5 V).|
|![LED](../images/week07/LED.jpg)|In this test, we tested a random LED to see how the voltage of an object outside of our ATTiny Blinky Board would compare. The voltage of the LED off by itself was ~1.5V.|
|<iframe width="320" height="250" src="https://youtube.com/watch?v=puFmBXO2UQg&feature=share"></iframe>
<figcaption>LED_Voltage</figcaption>|In this activity, we tested the voltage across the LED as the Arduino code was controlling it to fade. The voltage faded with the light being emitted from the LED.|
|<iframe width="320" height="250" src="https://youtube.com/watch?v=NMr0-j5TZWU&feature=share"></iframe>
<figcaption>Resisitor_Voltage</figcaption>|From this test, we saw that the resitor that accompanied the LED also shared the same voltage trends as the pulsating (fading up and down) voltage across the LED.|
|![GND_VCC](../images/week07/GND_VCC.jpg)|For this test, we tested the voltage across the ATTiny 412 chip. By placing the positive probe on the VCC pin, and the negative probe on the GND pin, we were able to see that the chip had a voltage of 3.3V. This matched what was going on with the capacitor; so the voltage "pulsations" were only occurring in the LED and the resistor-- not other parts of the circuit.|
In the following activity, we tested the voltage across the LED as the Arduino code was controlling it to fade. The voltage faded with the light being emitted from the LED.
<iframe width="320" height="250" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/puFmBXO2UQg" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
For the following test, we tested the voltage across the ATTiny 412 chip. By placing the positive probe on the VCC pin, and the negative probe on the GND pin, we were able to see that the chip had a voltage of 3.3V. This matched what was going on with the capacitor; so the voltage "pulsations" were only occurring in the LED and the resistor-- not other parts of the circuit.
<iframe width="320" height="250" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NMr0-j5TZWU" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -127,4 +127,6 @@ Shameless chance to post some photos of our team in action.
Unfortunately missing our steady cameraman, but we will be sure to capture him in future weeks!
[Link to Files](../files/adults_ComputerControlled_Machining/ComputerControlledMachining.zip)
......@@ -8,8 +8,7 @@ This week, our group assignment is to compare the performance and development wo
|Processors|High performance, low power AVR® 8-bit microcontroller|32-bit, [ARM® Cortex®-M0+ processor](https://www.arm.com/products/silicon-ip-cpu); This is the most energy-efficient ARM processor; has three low-power modes; used in wearables.|
|Architecture|RISC ([Reduced Instruction Set Computer](https://www.gartner.com/en/information-technology/glossary/risc-reduced-instruction-set-computer#:~:text=A%20processor%20architecture%20that%20shifts,can%20operate%20at%20higher%20speeds.): this type of processor is faster.|[ARMv6](https://www.microchip.com/en-us/products/microcontrollers-and-microprocessors/8-bit-mcus/avr-mcus)|
|# of Pins|32|14-24|
|Block Diagrams|[ATMega](../images/week09/ATMegaBlock.jpg)|![SAMD11](../images/week09/SAMD11Block.jpg)|
|Block Diagrams|![ATMega](../images/week09/ATMegaBlock.jpg)|![SAMD11](../images/week09/SAMD11Block.jpg)|
|Pinouts|![ATMega328](../images/week09/ATMega328.jpg)|![SAMD11](../images/week09/SAMD11Pinout.jpg)|
|I/O Packages|23 lines |up to 22 pins|
|Real-Time Counter Function|
|Code Examples|![ATMegaCode](../images/week09/ATMegaCode.jpg)[Source](https://www.xanthium.in/atmel-microchip-avr-atmega328p-rs485-communication-with-computer-tutorial-for-beginners)|![SAMDCode](../images/week09/SAMDCode.jpg)[Source](https://www.dropbox.com/s/z49niillnqct4gu/CombinedCodes.ino?dl=0)|
......@@ -31,13 +31,6 @@ The first thing we did was spray eight batman and superman "chip" molds with "Ea
One of the biggest things to note is the fact that the Task 3 Resin seemed to be outdated as it foamed. We thought at first that we didn't mix it well, and we redid it. The same thing happened when we repeated it. When we left that night, the Task 8 resin bubbled up. (The bubbles were not present when we left for the night). Within the eight hours we were gone, it not only bubbled in the center, but it also darkened in color.
File Links|
|---------|
|[Dragon Skin MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/8bho205leh7ib6m/DRAGON_SKIN_10NV_TB.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Mold Star 20T MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/4sxqjbriuiy611j/MOLD_STAR_20T.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Smooth Cast 300 MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/bxx36pjdahx2ta1/Smooth-Cast%20300%20Liquid%20Plastic.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Task 8 TB MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/bxx36pjdahx2ta1/Smooth-Cast%20300%20Liquid%20Plastic.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Task 2_3 TB MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/xneqmcw4yibueuk/TASK_2_3_TB.pdf?dl=0)|
|[Urethane Resin MSDS](https://www.dropbox.com/s/9fh2zydw03a6yzw/urathaneresin_msds.pdf?dl=0)|
[Link to Files/Datasheets](../files/adults_Molding_Casting/Molding_CastingDatasheets.zip)
......@@ -37,4 +37,4 @@ We further determined the linear correlations between voltage and current and vo
|File Links|
|----------|
|[PC280LG-301 DC Motor Datasheet](https://www.dropbox.com/s/se4tdycctedq9dv/PC280LG%20301.pdf?dl=0)|
|[PC280LG-301 DC Motor Datasheet](../files/adults_Outputs/PC280LG%20301.pdf)
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
This week, our group assignment is to send a message between two projects.
I was very excited to test out the "bus" that I had made with others in my group. Since I had a spot for an additional node on the end of it, we decided to use this bus and try to add one of Nidhie Dhiman's ATTiny 412 PCB's. We used an Arduino with the Parent, Child 1, Child 2, and Child 3 merely as a power source. To prove that the Parent board was controlling the others, we uploaded a basic blink code onto the Arduino that was demonstratiing the blinling with the builtin LED.
We were interested in testing out the "bus" that Barbara had made with others in the group. Since there was a spot for an additional node on the end of it, we decided to use this bus and try to add one of Nidhie Dhiman's ATTiny 412 PCB's. We used an Arduino with the Parent, Child 1, Child 2, and Child 3 merely as a power source. To prove that the Parent board was controlling the others, we uploaded a basic blink code onto the Arduino that was demonstratiing the blinling with the builtin LED.
We uploaded the following code onto her board with no problems.
......
# 16. Interface and application programming
# 16. Interface and application programming (CLS adults)
This week the group was asked to compare as many tool options as possible for interface and applications programming.
......@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ Since most of us are beginners in this topic, most of us gravitated towards the
>>>Processing is a flexible software sketchbook and a language for learning how to code within the context of the visual arts.
In many respects, it feels like Arduino but for applications and interfaces. This similarity goes as far as some of the commands and language being identical to the Ardunio IDE. Another benefit of Processing is the great documentation found at [https://processing.org/reference](https://processing.org/reference). Implementing changes to the environment are quick and snappy, and the code can be reloaded in no time.
In many respects, it feels like Arduino but for applications and interfaces. This similarity goes as far as some of the commands and language being identical to the Ardunio IDE. For example, the setup functions and draw functions in the Precessing IDE are very similar to the setup and loop function in the Arduino IDE. Another benefit of Processing is the great documentation found at [https://processing.org/reference](https://processing.org/reference). Implementing changes to the environment are quick and snappy, and the code can be reloaded in no time using the serial monitor.
Better yet, interfacing Processing with Ardunio through serial commands proved quick and easy. Our instructors directed us towards several tutorial options for doing so.
......@@ -18,3 +18,7 @@ Better yet, interfacing Processing with Ardunio through serial commands proved q
* [howtomechatronics.com - Processing](https://howtomechatronics.com/tutorials/arduino/processing/)
Neil recommended Processing for UI/Apps beginners who like Arduino and our group has found this to be a true statement.
One member who did not use Processing, was Nick Niles, who developed a project in Unity. Nick downloaded [virtual serial monitor](https://www.virtual-serial-port.org/com-port-monitor-download.html) app, and after a few of us had been dealing with serial monitor issues (with the ATTiny 1614 chip) some of Nick's work pertained to those who did. Nick is very fluent with computer programming, and his project was phenomenal (especially for those of us who are not). He first ran the "Hello" arduino code, and he was able to see the word "Hello" appear in his virtual serial monitor.
In order for Nick to use his soil moisture sensor, he had to improve the data that he was collecting so that it could be parsed. In order to do this, Nick used another software called CoolTerm (one that Dr. Harris had mentioned to us during his Networking lesson). He added special chars to the data that allowed it to be parsable, and then using C# code in Unity, Nick was able to view the data (coming from Arduino) in Unity. Now that he was able to do this, Nick then was able to manipulate the data in order to control the rain (size and amount) in Unity. As Nick placed the soil moisture sensor in the water, he was able to create rain in Unity.
/*
Stepper Motor Control - one revolution
This program drives a unipolar or bipolar stepper motor.
The motor is attached to digital pins 8 - 11 of the Arduino.
The motor should revolve one revolution in one direction, then
one revolution in the other direction.
Created 11 Mar. 2007
Modified 30 Nov. 2009
by Tom Igoe
*/
#include <Stepper.h>
const int stepsPerRevolution = 200; // change this to fit the number of steps per revolution
// for your motor
// initialize the stepper library on pins 8 through 11:
Stepper myStepper(stepsPerRevolution, 8, 9, 10, 11);
void setup() {
// set the speed at 60 rpm:
myStepper.setSpeed(60);
// initialize the serial port:
Serial.begin(9600);
}
void loop() {
// step one revolution in one direction:
Serial.println("clockwise");
myStepper.step(stepsPerRevolution);
delay(500);
// step one revolution in the other direction:
Serial.println("counterclockwise");
myStepper.step(-stepsPerRevolution);
delay(500);
}
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