Commit b7dce8ce authored by Jesse Eubanks's avatar Jesse Eubanks
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<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>This week we ended up looking into a lot of different types of microcontrollers.
Microcontrollers are basically small computers that are designed to govern a specific
operation inside of a system. The microcontroller is said to be embedded within that
system in order to operate the single function that it is designed to do. And there
the title of this week is name-dropped.</p>
<p>The list of different boards we looked at is as follows</p>
<ul>
<li>ATTINY 1616</li>
<li>ATmega328</li>
<li>Adafruit Trinket 5V</li>
<li>Teensy 4.0</li>
<li>Feather M0 LoRa</li>
<li>LOLIN32 Pro</li>
</ul>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embprog2.jpg" class="image">
<img src="Images\embprog2.jpg" class="image" width="60%">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>the board that I researched myself was the Feather M0 LoRa that we had in our Lab. I found that the:</p>
<ul>
<li>Processor = ARM (Cortex M0)</li>
<li>Bus width = 32 bit</li>
<li>Clock Speed = 48MHz</li>
<li>Memory = 256K of FLASH</li>
<li>20 GPIO pins, 8 PWM pins, 10 analog inputs, and 1 analog output</li>
<li>Logic Level Voltage = 3.3V</li>
</ul>
<p>The pinout diagram is as followed below:</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embprog3.JPG" class="image">
<img src="Images\embprog3.JPG" class="image" width="80%">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>We have all of this data comparing each of these microcontrollers, but we do not have
any physical representation to see what they actually mean. Below we have a picture comparing the
clock speed of the Teensy 4.0 vs. a couple of different Microcontrollers. What we see below is the
clock speed in binary, and since the clock speed of the Teensy is 600MHz, we can see a drastic difference in
the frequency on the oscilloscope.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\clock.jpg" class="image" width="50%">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<h1>Arduino IDE</h1>
<p>Now I will go over a couple of the programming processes that I can use to code
my boards. To start off we will be looking at the Arduino IDE to program my attiny 1616
that I have on my board design.</p>
<p>When first opening up the Arduino IDE, This is the basic screen that you will be met with.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro1.JPG" class="image">
<img src="Images\embpro1.JPG" class="image" width="70%">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Since we are using the Arduino IDE we need to make sure that we can program our specific board.
The first the we will need to do is to download a board library. To start this process we will head over to preferences. and add
a URL to the section called "Additional Boards Manager URLs"</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro2.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Once that is done, we can open up the boards manager menu and download the specific library we are looking for.
In this case I search "megaTinyCore" and downloaded the library by Spence Klonde.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro3.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Next I can go back to tools into boards now we can go and click on megaTinyCore and select the specific boards we
are looking to use. In this case I selected "ATtiny3226/3216/1626/1616/1606/826/816/806/426/416/406"</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro4.jpg" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Now we can select the specific chip and board that we need.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro5.jpg" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Before running any code, we need to make sure that the programmer is set correctly, in this case I selected
"pyupdi" and that we can select a port.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro6.JPG" class="image">
<img src="Images\embpro6.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>When code is successfully compiled and sent to uploaded to our chip, we will see this message.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro7.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Lastly, the serial monitor will be used a lot while using this IDE and this is what that looks like.</p>
<h1>Platform.io IDE</h1>
<div class="img-with-text">
......@@ -168,32 +234,56 @@ footer {
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>When first opening up Platform.io, we are welcomed with this screen. we want to click on the bee
symbol to get things started. Platform.io can be found within Visual Studio.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro9.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>This is the home screen for Platform.io, we want to go and click the new project button.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro10.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Unlike the arduino IDE, platform.io will allow you to search from a plethera of different boards. Once one
is selected it will download everything that you wil need for you. Also, unlike when we had to manually change
boards and programmers in arduion, platform.io will do that for us.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro11.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>To start programming we will need to go to under src to main.cpp, this is where our void setup and
void loop will be loacated. We can go ahead and type out all of our code here.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\embpro12.JPG" class="image">
<i>What you see when opening Fusion 360</i>
</div>
<p>Just like arduino we can open up a serial monitor for our port and view what is on serial.</p>
<video class="image" height="240" controls autoplay loop>
<source src="embprov.mp4" type="video/mp4">
Your browser does not support the video tag.
</video>
<p>This first video is a quick shot of when I got some simple blinking code to work on my on my board.
Below is nothing too fancy but is something quick to show how we can dim and light up LED's</p>
<p>Originally I forgot to add the correct video that corresponded with the code, but below should be the correct example.</p>
<video class="image" height="240" controls autoplay loop>
<source src="embprov2.mp4" type="video/mp4">
Your browser does not support the video tag.
</video>
<h1>Attachments</h1>
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