Commit b75e84c2 authored by Jesse Eubanks's avatar Jesse Eubanks
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<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>During our group lab, we were tasked with testing out a couple of casting materials that we had in our lab.
The vast majority of the product we were using came from the company called Smooth-on. The first product
of theirs that we used was called FlexFoam-iT! III. The weight by mixing ratio for the A and B solutions
was about 57.5:100. We measured this out using a scale and a paper cup so that we could pour the correct
ratio. The solutions were quite viscous so getting the exact amount wasn't necessarily the easiest process.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\moldingg2.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>While the FlexFoam-iT! Mold cured decided that it would be good to test out fast cast white plastic material.
It felt a little harder to get the exact ratio for this one as all three people in our group tried to get one
done and only two were successful. </p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\moldingg3.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
......@@ -136,16 +146,25 @@ p.agreement {
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>As we can see the FlexFoam-iT! mold exapanded much more volume than the fast casting material that we used, it also took much
longer to cure as expected.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\moldingg5.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Our mold ened up being semmi successful as the correct shape came out, it was a test mold so it wasn't the
cleanest casting that could ever be done, but it was better than what some of the other groups in our lab ended
up producing.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\moldingg6.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>To view the research my lab did regarding different go <a href="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1vK8T3OKmhv-N4Ts2zlH_HEPS3VmPY6-apdwi1VKK6LA/edit#gid=961259977">HERE</a>.</p>
<h1>Mold Fusion 360</h1>
<div class="img-with-text">
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<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Here is the design that I used to create initial mold for the individual assignment
this week. The two designs are based off of the symbol from Elder Scrolls VI: skyrim
and a pokeball from Pokemon. To create these designs I first created a block that was
close to the dimensions of the wax material that I was given. To create the Skyrim logo
I imported an svg to create the sketch, while the pokeball I just manually drew out each
section to create the logo. I also wanted to make sure that I used 3 axis milling so I
made sure to include slopes in my design, so that not only will the Roland desktop mill
need to move in the x and y directions during the toolpath, but in the z direction as well.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding2.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Next I went over to the manufacturing section of my design. The first thing I needed
to do was create the setup for my toolpath. Below you can see me select the stock for
my design where this time I only need to select a solid. I also arranged the origin
in the correct orientation that would line up with the specifications of my Roland mill.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding3.jpg" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>The first tool path that we needed to create was a roughing one to clear out the material
before smoothing it down. To do this I used the pocket clearing tool in the 3 axis
section. The adaptive clearing tool can work as well these are the two main roughing
tools that I use for 3 axis milling. </p>
<p>Below you can see the bit that I used for the roughing toolpath. It was a 6mm bit. The size of this bit can be
quite large as we are only looking to clear away material.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding4.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>When usig the pocket clearung tool we first want to go to geometry and partion out the
area that we will be milling in. Below you can see what I selected to get this done. We also want the
Model section to be checked as well.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding5.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Next, in the passes tab, there are a couple of settings that you can twerk here.
First, I selected the manual stepover box, you can let this be done automatically.
Just remember that the diameter of your bit is important and since I’m currently
using a 6mm bit I could increase this value quite a bit. The maximum roughing
stepdown is the next important value in this section, This will determine how far
it will move down each pass. Here I set it to be about 2mm. Finally, it would make
sense to select the flat area detection and stock to leave boxes.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding6.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<img src="Images\molding6.JPG" class="image" width="30%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Below is what my specified tool path will look like.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding7.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>There are multiple different toolpath types that can be used for smoothing out
my design. Most of these toolpaths lay below the roughing toolpaths,
adaptive clearing and pocket clearing, and in this case I decided to use steep and shallow.
</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding8.jpg" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>For smoothing I ended up using a 1.2mm bit. Since I was now smoothing my material
I needed a much smaller bit than the previous 6mm on that I was using. You could go even smaller if you wanted
your design to be even more detailed.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding9.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Below is the toolpath that was calculated for my smoothing cut.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding10.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>When using post process we need to make sure that that we have Roland RML selected as
our machine and we can change the machine type to MDX-40</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\molding11.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
......@@ -210,46 +279,91 @@ p.agreement {
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>First, I loaded and secured my wax block into the Roland desktop mill. I secured
it using double tape, which the first time I ran my toolpath was jared free but succesive
cut were successful. I also loaded in the 6mm bit the I was using for roughing.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting2.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Here is what the result of my first toolpath that I ran. One problem with this tool path was that it
did not want to mill in cetain places becaise my bit was too big so I ended up needing to
cut some wax off myself when the smoothing toolpath was done.</p>
<video class="image" height="240" controls autoplay loop>
<source src="castingv1.mp4" type="video/mp4">
Your browser does not support the video tag.
</video>
<p>Here is a video of my the Roland cutting my toolpath. The roland actually did very well with this kind of
cut and I was very satisfied with its performance.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting3.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Above is the Roland after finishing the roughing toolpath. As you can see, this created a lot of
material that I needed to vacuum up after the fact.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting4.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Above is the final result of the two roughing toolpaths that I created. I was quite happy with the
results.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting5.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Here is the results of the smoothing toolpaths that I created, Which looked quite nice when everything
was finished.</p>
<p>One problem that I had to fix was for the skyrim mold I had to cut away a little excess material that the roughing
toolpath couldn't reach and in the process of this I broke the wings of the dragon. I ended up glueing it back on but
it gave me a heart attack when it first happened. Another problem I had was that my smoothing toolpath would try to cut some excess material that
it didnt need to cut at the end which caused the rpm of the bit to increase so much the Roland shut itself down. To fix this I
ended up just stopping the cut early at the end.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting6.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>The material that I used to create my mold was called Mold Star 30. This material had mixing by weight ration of
about 100:96. I used the same method we used in the lab by using a scale and some paper cups to try to get the
most accurate ratio possible. The pot life is about 45min so I had plenty of time after I mixed the two solutions.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting7.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Above you can see how I filled the wax material with the mixture of the two solutions. The cure time
was then about 6 hours so I needed to wait a little for until I had my mold completed. </p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\moldfinal.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>The result of the mold can be seen above and it came out really well and I was quite happy with the result.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting8.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>Next I wanted to use FlexFoam IT! III for my casting process. The mixing by weight ratio is 57.5:100 and the pot
life this time around is only 35sec so I would nee to be much quicker to get it into the mold. The upside is that the cure
time is only around 2 hours so I would get the finished result quickly. Sadley, even though I had plenty of time, the lid
to the solution A material was glued to the bottle and I couldn't get the lid off for the life of me.</p>
<div class="img-with-text">
<img src="Images\casting9.JPG" class="image" width="60%">
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
......@@ -260,6 +374,9 @@ p.agreement {
<i>Equation for spindal speed</i>
</div>
<p>So instead, even though Mold Star 30 is not food safe, I filled my mold up with water and put it into my freezer.
Above is the result of what my final product looks like. It creates some nice ice sculpture if I do say so myself.</p>
<h1>Attachments</h1>
<iframe src="https://a360.co/3gxMx0V" width="800" height="600"></iframe>
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Roland Files:
<ul>
<li><p><a href="Molding1.prn">Pokeball Clearing</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding2.prn">Skyrim Clearing</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding3.prn">Pokeball Smoothing</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding4.prn">Skyrim Smoothing</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding1.prn">Molding1.prn</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding2.prn">Molding2.prn</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding3.prn">Molding3.prn</a></p></li>
<li><p><a href="Molding4.prn">Molding4.prn</a></p></li>
</ul>
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