Commit 9d84e99d authored by Jonathan Chery's avatar Jonathan Chery
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Finished Week 05

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This week I worked on:
- Designed a parametric press-fit construction kit
- Lasercut a parametric press-fit construction kit
- Designing a parametric press-fit construction kit
- Lasercutting a parametric press-fit construction kit
- Cutting using a vinylcutter
- Group Assignment
## Designed a parametric press-fit construction kit
## Designing a parametric press-fit construction kit
This week, I worked on creating a parametric press-fit construction kit. The kit was a two cubes that can be taken apart and assembled in multiple ways. To be able to do so, my design was using finger joints. Finger joints, also known as a comb joint, is a woodworking joint made by cutting a set of complementary, interlocking profiles in two pieces of wood.
......@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ My repetitive process lead way to the following:
![final](../images/week04/final.png)
## Lasercut a parametric press-fit construction kit
## Lasercutting a parametric press-fit construction kit
Lasercutting my design requires me to export my design into a DXF file. There are **two** ways to do this. One way is to use a plugin. The pluggin I mentioned earlier called [DXF for Laser](https://apps.autodesk.com/FUSION/en/Detail/Index?id=7634902334100976871&os=Win64&appLang=en). Another way is to create a *DXF* from your objects within Fusion and exporting those objects onto the lasercutting machine.
Though I downloaded the pluggin that would do the work for me, I decided to discuss the process needed to export to dxf without the pluggin. The first thing to do is to copy all the pieces and leave the original where they are. The copies will be the one I will be working with. The goal with the copies is to lay all the parts out so that they are flat on the Fusion plain so that I can export or create a drawing of all of the faces in the next board that is a DXF. Once everything is align on the same plain, select a face and start a new sketch on that face.
......
# 5. Electronics production
This week I worked on:
- Learning about PCB
- Learning about PCB
- Learning how to Design a PCB
- Making an in-circuit programmer
- Soldering Electronics
- Tested my in-circuit programmer
- Group Assignment
---
- Creating a programmer PCB w/ a team member
- Learning about Soldering Electronics
- Testing the programmer PCB
---
## Learning about PCB (Print-Circuit Board)
This was the first time I ever heard about PCB (Printed Circuit Board). That said, I was not sure what that was. I was able to get an good understanding of what a PCB is and what it does through [Adafruit's Circuit Playground](https://learn.adafruit.com/series/circuit-playground), specifically their [Circuit Playground - P is for PCB](https://learn.adafruit.com/circuit-playground-p-is-for-pcb) video. Additionally, I was able to learn more about PCBs through [What are PCBs || How do PCBs Work?](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2LgmIGE2nI).
That said, PCBs as the foundational building block of most modern electronic devices. PCBs allows signals and power to be routed between physical devices. By soldering metals, we can make electrical connections between the surface of the PCB and the electronic components.
## Learning About PCB
To learn about PCB, I went on LinkedIn Learning as I found their resouces quite helpful. There were several resources about learning PCB design with an some type of application. Below are a list of eye-catchers that I found on LinkedIn Learning.
Once I learned what a PCB was, it was time to learn how to design a PCB.
## Learning how to Design a PCB
I navigated to LinkedIn Learning to learn how to design PCB with EAGLE.
- [Learning Altium](https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-altium/what-is-altium?u=74653650)
- [Learning PCB Design with EAGLE](https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-pcb-design-with-eagle)
- [Learning PCB Design with OrCAD](https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-pcb-design-with-orcad/)
- [Learning SOLIDWORKS PCB](https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-solidworks-pcb/welcome?u=74653650)
However, before delving into one of them, I sought out guidance from my mentor. I was told those videos would be more helpful during another week and for this week's task, it was much simplier. I was to used previous design like the ones below
The Learning PCB Design with EAGLE with Taylor Hokanson is a 1 hour and 15 minutes course that teaches individuals how to prepare electronic schematics for fabrication as printed circuit boards (PCBs) using the EAGLE PCB layout software from Autodesk.
## Making an in-circuit programmer w/ help
I was told that this week assignment was much simplier than I thought and I can used a previous design like the following:
- [Calibration.png](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_calib.png)
- [Trace.png](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_traces.png)
- [Interior](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_outline.png)
to replicate a PCB programmer (link the one below).
to replicate a PCB programmer link the one below:
![final_preview_example](../images/week05/preview.jpg)
However, through the clarification of this week's assignment, I was able to gain a better understanding of what a PCB is through my mentor and through Youtube. From what I understand, PCB stands for *printed circuit boards* and they are the foundational building block of most modern electronic devices. PCBs allows signals and power to be routed between physical devices. By soldering metals, we can make electrical connections between the surface of the PCB and the electronic components.
For a better and more detailed explanation of PCBs and how they work, you can watch this video [What are PCBs || How do PCBs Work?](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2LgmIGE2nI)
## Creating a programmer PCB w/ a team member
After gaining a better understanding of PCB, it was time to create one. With the help of my instructor, [Spencer Mewherter](http://fabacademy.org/2020/labs/dassault/students/spencer-mewherter/), and team member, [Xiaolin (Linda) Zhen](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/linda-zhen/), we were able to create a PCB.
With the help of my instructor, [Spencer Mewherter](http://fabacademy.org/2020/labs/dassault/students/spencer-mewherter/), and team member, [Xiaolin (Linda) Zhen](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/linda-zhen/), we were able to create a PCB.
![teamwork_pcb](../images/week05/teamwork.jpg)
The process was simple. We acquired the files from the class resources.
The [Trace.png](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_traces.png) file creates the lines on the PCB for the electricity to travel. I like to think of Trace as a trace path for electricity.
The [Interior](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_outline.png) file creates the cutout of your PCB.
Minimal but effective. The process to create the above or a similar PCB was simple. We used the [Trace.png](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_traces.png) file which created the lines (the traces) on the PCB for the electricity to travel. I like to think of the Traces as a path for the electricity.
The [Interior](https://github.com/fablaboulu/updi_arduino_programmer/blob/master/updi_programmer_outline.png) file created the cutout of the PCB.
![trace](../images/week05/trace.png)
Now, in order to get the Trace and Interior to be placed on copper, we first need a milling machine. We used a MonoFab SRM-20.
Now, in order to get the Trace and Interior to be placed on Copper, we needed to use the MonoFab SRM-20, the milling machine.
![monofab](../images/week05/monofab.jpg)
This machine was simple to use as it came with a platform that allowed up to interact with the machine.
So, starting off with Trace, we used a 1/64 SE 2Fl Altin Coated miling pin.
The machine was not difficult to use. We started with the Traces as it is best practice to do so. We used a 1/64 SE 2FL Altin Coated miling pin to mill the traces.
![miling](../images/week05/miling.jpg)
Once we finished with the Trace, we changed the pin to a 1/32 SE 2FL Altin Coated miling pin for the Interior cut.
Once finished with the Traces, we changed the mill to a 1/32 SE 2FL Altin Coated mill for the Interior cut.
![milingpin2](../images/week05/milingpin2.jpeg)
The result came out okay as the mills were worn out. However, this made for a good practice.
## Learning About Soldering Electronics
Once we were finished with miling, we moved onto soldering the electronics. Soldering the electronics consisted of us using a soldering station with a soldering iron to melt lead onto our PCB so we can attach components that will allow our PCB to become a programmer and communicate with other electronics.
## Soldering Electronics
Once we were finished with miling, we moved onto soldering the electronics. Soldering the electronics consisted of us using a soldering station with a soldering iron to melt lead onto our PCB. Melting lead onto the PCB allowed us to attach each component to the PCB. With the components attached to the PCB, we can program the PCB.
To get started, we set up the environment to begin soldering.
![soldering](../images/week05/soldering.png)
Soldering took time and patience but, with enought practice, it does get easier. Watching the LinkedIn Learning course on Soldering electronics did provide a few techniques to have a clean result.
The soldering process takes time and patience but, it is quite peaceful. With enough practice, it becomes easier. Prior to soldering, I was able to watch a LinkedIn Learning about best practices and tools for Soldering. , with enought practice, it does get easier. Watching the LinkedIn Learning course on Soldering electronics did provide a few techniques to have a clean result - [Learning Soldering for Electronics](https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-soldering-for-electronics/solder-a-standard-resistor-into-a-pcb?u=74653650).
![complete](../images/week05/complete.png)
......@@ -69,10 +78,16 @@ Soldering took time and patience but, with enought practice, it does get easier.
*The above PCBs was created with the help of [Xiaolin (Linda) Zhen](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/linda-zhen/).*
As mentioned, this above board was good practice in making an in-circuit PCB board. I want to re-make the in-circuit PCB board as I felt the Traces were not as clean as I would like them to be.
## Testing the Programmer PCB
Testing the PCB came to be a simple task. After completing the PCB design and soldering the components together, I performed a Burning Test. A Burning Test is simply plugging your PCB through a USB slot and see if any smoking occurs on the PCB.
I was able to test the PCB board by performing a burn-in. A burn-in is the testing of a PCB to detect early failures and establish load capacity. This is often done by running a power supply and firmware through the electronics for some time.
I connected the PCB to my computer via USB for some time:
![no_smoking](../images/week05/no_smoking.jpg)
Since no smoking occured, I believe my PCB was well soldered.
No smoking occured while it was being plugged into the computer. I concluded that the burn-in test passed and the integrated PCB can be used.
# Group Assignment
This week group assignment was to characterize the design rules for the team PCB production. You can find that information in the group page: [Link](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/)
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# Table Of Content
1. [Principles and Practices](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week01/)
2. [Project Management](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week02/)
3. [Computer-Aided Design](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week03/)
4. [Computer-Controlled Cutting](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week04/)
Week 01 - [Principles and Practices](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week01/)
Week 02 - [Project Management](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week02/)
Week 03 - [Computer-Aided Design](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week03/)
Week 04 - [Computer-Controlled Cutting](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week04/)
Week 05 - [Electronics Production](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week05/)
Week 06 - [In Progress](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week06/)
Week 07 - [In Progress](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week07/)
Week 08 - [In Progress](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week08/)
Week 09 - [In Progress](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week09/)
Week 10 - [In Progress](http://fabacademy.org/2021/labs/dassault/students/jonathan-chery/assignments/week10/)
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