Commit 53393f3d by Brigette O'Neill

Update week05.md

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## Milling
First things first, you're gonna want a Modela mill. Modela mills are pretty cost efficient, small, and pretty easy to use. Only thing is is that they make pretty chunky circuits (none of that fine stuff for you) and use mods. Now, a lot of people don't like mods, especially the poeple at Lorain. Luckily, Professor Gershenfeld made my dad make hsi oard last year using mods. So when we got to Lorain and found out they hadn't used the machine for a year and a half, my dad knew how to step in. This is a process I wasn't a huge part of, but its a really weird thing that not a lot of people have to deal with. I learned its very useful to learn mods so that I can do the same thing my dad did and help solve a problem.
First things first, you're gonna want a Modela mill. Modela mills are pretty cost efficient, small, and pretty easy to use. Only thing is is that they make pretty chunky circuits (none of that fine stuff for you) and use mods. Now, a lot of people don't like mods, especially the poeple at Lorain. Luckily, Professor Gershenfeld made my dad make his final project last year with a mods interface. So when we got to Lorain and found out they hadn't used the machine for a year and a half, my dad knew how to step in. This is a process I wasn't a huge part of, but its a really weird thing that not a lot of people have to deal with. I learned its very useful to learn mods so that I can do the same thing my dad did and help solve a problem.
Now you're gonna want to switch out some of your drill bits. For engraving the thing and making all your connections and what not, you're gonna want to use a 1/64th in. bit. Noticed how small that is? Well lets just say that size is proportional to ability to break. Smaller the size, bigger the risk in breaking it. Another thing I noticed is that the smaller the tool is, the harder it is to find it. Modela's require some very small hex keys, so I would just invest in having a little pouch on the side of yours where you always keep it instead of having to sort through a bunch of hex keys looking for on that might fit.
Now you're gonna want to switch out some of your drill bits. For engraving the thing and making all your connections and what not, you're gonna want to use a 1/64th in. bit. Noticed how small that is? Well lets just say that size is proportional to ability to break. Smaller the size, bigger the risk in breaking it. Another thing I noticed is that the smaller the tool is, the harder it is to find it. Modela's require some very small hex keys, so I would just invest in having a little pouch on the side of yours where you always keep it instead of having to sort through a bunch of hex keys looking for on that might fit. So what you want to do now is loosen the bolt part of the mill. Gently take out whatever bit was in there and make sure it doesn't directly drop down. Then gently put the 1/64th bit in and tighten with the hex key again. Make sure the bit is secure by tapping the side a bit.
Once you got the machine all set up, tape your board down on the base of the mill. For the Modela, it's easier to use double sided tape. For machines like the LPKF, masking tape is fine. The reason why you want to use double sided tape is because you don't want you piece popping out mid cut. I alway's knew there was a lot of guesstimating in fabrication, but you gotta get good at it if you want to succeed. So, guesstimate approxiametly where your board is going to be and stick a piece of doubel sided tape on the back. Then, stick some strips of double sided tape on the back edges. Place the baord down and bam. Good to go.
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Once you got the machine all set up, tape your board down on the base of the mill. For the Modela, it's easier to use double sided tape. For machines like the LPKF, masking tape is fine. The reason why you want to use double sided tape is because you don't want you piece popping out mid cut. I alway's knew there was a lot of guesstimating in fabrication, but you gotta get good at it if you want to succeed. So, guesstimate approxiametly where your board is going to be and stick a piece of doubel sided tape on the back. Then, stick some strips of double sided tape on the back edges. Place the baord down and bam. Good to go.
Let's actually get the board cut out now. So, first you want to set the material width, height, and length
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